3 Tips From Meenoo Rami for Successful Mentoring and Networking

"Teaching is a profession that eats its young. Meenoo Rami offers guidelines for surviving the challenges of the classroom as well as the faculty room."
Carol Jago, author, teacher, and past president of NCTE

At the 26th Annual Model Schools Conference, International Center for Leadership in Education's Director of Professional Learning, Dr. Robert Peters, sat down with Meenoo Rami to discuss tips for successful mentoring and networking, for both new and seasoned educators alike. Meenoo is the author of Thrive and currently works as Manager for Minecraft Education at Microsoft, where she helps to reimagine game-based learning for the classroom. A national board certified teacher, she taught students English in Philadelphia for 10 years, has served as a teacher-consultant for the Philadelphia Writing Project and an educational consultant with The Educator Collaborative, and is the founder of #engchat, an international Twitter chat for English teachers.

We've compiled three key takeaways from Meenoo on how to better find a mentor:

  1. "Be clear about what your needs are." What areas do you want to improve? When you know what you need, you can better determine who could be a good mentor.
  2. "Look at the other people around you who are kicking butt." Who is setting an example you'd like to follow? Who are your successful role models? Don't be afraid to ask peers to observe them in their classrooms.
  3. "We live in a network world now." Take advantage of your community. Support can be found on social media, such as LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook. 

And of course, the 27th Model Schools Conference will be a great opportunity to network and to identify your classroom needs and potential mentors. Watch the full Facebook Live interview below to hear more insights.

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Join more than 5,000 educators in 100+ sessions at the 27th Annual Model Schools Conference in Washington, D.C., from June 23-26, 2019, where you can learn what steps to take to act for impact in your school or district.