Carol Jago
Close Reading; Academic Vocabulary

Carol Jago has taught middle and high school for more than 30 years and is associate director of the California Reading and Literature Project at UCLA. She is past president of the National Council of Teachers of English and serves as an associate director of the California Reading and Literature Project at UCLA. She served as AP Literature content advisor for the College Board. Carol Jago is also an advisor for Journeys, HMH Collections, and is co-author of Holt McDougal Literature and Steck-Vaughn Transitions: Preparing for College Writing.

Carol Jago has taught middle and high school for more than 30 years and is associate director of the California Reading and Literature Project at UCLA. She is past president of the National Council of Teachers of English and serves as an associate director of the California Reading and Literature Project at UCLA. She served as AP Literature content advisor for the College Board. Carol Jago is also an advisor for Journeys, HMH Collections, and is co-author of Holt McDougal Literature and Steck-Vaughn Transitions: Preparing for College Writing.

THE LATEST
The Bad Habits of Good Readers
Carol Jago, HMH author and program consultant, makes the case for the seemingly bad habits avid readers possess. 
Carol Jago
Close Reading; Academic Vocabulary
November 30, 2017
Click Here for Closer Digital Reading
Carol Jago investigates the differences between print and screen-based reading and offers advice for helping students understand and overcome the distractions of online reading.
Carol Jago
Close Reading; Academic Vocabulary
April 12, 2017
Getting It by Heart: The Value in Memorizing Poetry
In celebration of National Poetry Month, HMH ELA Program Author Carol Jago explains the value in memorizing poetry and the importance of uninterrupted reading.  
Carol Jago
Close Reading; Academic Vocabulary
April 14, 2016
Beyond the Written Word
Close Readings of Complex Visual Texts
Visual artists approach their work with the same purposes as writers: to persuade, to explain, and to convey experience real or imagined. The difference is in their tools. While writers employ diction, syntax, and imagery to establish a tone and convey their message; visual artists use color, line, shape, object, and scale.
Carol Jago
Close Reading; Academic Vocabulary
July 06, 2015