Woodcock-Muñoz

WMLS-R NU
IIP WMLS-R NU
  • WMLS-R NU

    WMLS™-R NU

    Authors (2005): Richard W. Woodcock, Ana F. Muñoz-Sandoval, Mary L. Ruef, Criselda G. Alvarado

    Authors (2010 Normative Update): Fredrick A. Schrank, Barbara J. Wendling, Criselda G. Alvarado, and Richard W. Woodcock

    Type: Norm-referenced measure of reading, writing, listening, and language comprehension

    Purpose: Establishes language proficiency level in English or Spanish

    Ages: 2 years to 90+ years

    Times: 55 minutes for all seven tests; 25 minutes for screening measure

    Scoring: The WMLS-R NU Scoring and Reporting Program, available online or on CD

    Restriction Level: Medium; Examiner Qualifications

    Funding Sources: Title I, IDEA, Professional Development

    Woodcock-Muñoz Language Survey–Revised Normative Update (WMLS-R NU)

    Overview

    The Woodcock-Muñoz Language Survey®—Revised Normative Update (WMLS-R NU) provides a norm-referenced measure of reading, writing, listening, and language comprehension. It features two English forms and one Spanish form. Age norms are available from 2 to 90+ and grade norms are available for K to graduate school.

    Uses

    • Assess level of English Language Proficiency (ELP)
    • Measure cognitive-academic language proficiency (CALP)
    • Determine eligibility for bilingual services
    • Plan instructional programs
    • Monitor progress
    • Evaluate program effectiveness
    • Perform research studies
    • Fulfill requirements for English language proficiency testing under NCLB
    • Assess appropriateness of high-status testing for English Language Learners (including both achievement testing and gifted assessment)
    • Spanish Parent Report strengthens connection between home and school
    • Link assessment scores to intervention with optional Instructional Interventions Program to support English Language Learners

    The WMLS-R NU can help users meet requirements under two major Federal education laws. NCLB requires that schools provide annual assessment of English language proficiency in the four domains of reading, writing, speaking, and listening.

    Title III also requires reporting of student progress in English language comprehension, which may be demonstrated through listening and reading. Finally, listening comprehension must include assessment of the student's ability to understand and perform in academics. Because the WMLS-R NU emphasizes the role of cognitive-academic language proficiency (CALP) levels in the assessment of language comprehension, it may serve as an excellent predictor of students' actual academic adjustment.

    The WMLS-R NU offers new, expanded measurements of CALP levels compared to the previous edition. In addition, the WMLS-R NU can help users meet requirements for the assessment of specific learning disabilities (SLD) under IDEA, which makes it clear that professionals must rule out limited English language proficiency before referral for special education under SLD is possible.

    Explore More

    • Administration

      Administration

      The WMLS™-R NU includes seven individually administered tests:

      • Test 1: Picture Vocabulary
        • Measures aspects of oral language, including language development and lexical knowledge. The task requires the subject to identify pictured objects.
      • Test 2: Verbal Analogies
        • Measures ability to reason using lexical knowledge. The task requires listening to three words of an analogy and then completing the analogy with an appropriate fourth word.
      • Test 3: Letter-Word Identification
        • Measures letter and word identification skills. The early items on the test require the subject to identify letters of the alphabet. Later, words are presented, and the subject is required to fluently read the words.
      • Test 4: Dictation
        • The initial items in Dictation measure prewriting skills, such as drawing lines, tracing letters, and copying letters. The remaining items measure a subject's ability to respond in writing to a variety of questions pertaining to letter forms, spelling, punctuation, capitalization, and word usage.
      • Test 5: Understanding Directions
        • Measures aspects of oral language including listening skills, lexical knowledge, and working memory. The task requires the subject to listen to a sequence of audio-recorded instructions and then follow the directions by pointing to various objects in a colored picture.
      • Test 6: Story Recall
        • Measures aspects of oral language including listening skills, meaningful memory, and expressive language. The task requires the subject to recall increasingly complex stories that are presented using an audio recording.
      • Test 7: Passage Comprehension
        • Measures how well a subject understands written discourse as it is being read. The initial passage comprehension items involve symbolic learning, or the ability to match a picture representation of a word with an actual picture of the object. The next items are presented in multiple-choice format and require the subject to point to the picture represented by a phrase. The remaining items require the subject to read a short passage and identify a missing key word that makes sense in the context of that passage.
    • Scoring

      Scoring

      Houghton Mifflin Harcourt now provides web-based access to the Woodcock-Johnson® Assessment Suite, including the Woodcock-Muñoz Language Survey®–Revised Normative Update (WMLS-R NU). This online reporting system for basic scoring and reporting is provided free through the purchase of new materials and packages.

      This new system offers you:

      • 24/7 secure access from any computer with Internet access
      • Real-time accurate and reliable results
      • Robust reporting including new roster and longitudinal reports
      • Offline scoring capabilities through mobile apps for each of the WJ assessments
        (coming soon)

      Note that WMLS-R NU kits have been reconfigured in order to enable online scoring with purchases.

      With online scoring and reporting, examiners can enter raw scores for WMLS-R and receive reports for all derived scores and clusters. The online system provides all the best features of the previous WMLS-R NU Scoring and Reporting Program with new enhancements. Examiners who already own a CD may continue to use it, but the new kits now include access to online scoring.

      Online scoring and reporting provides a secure, protected environment for examiners to enter assessment data, add test session observations, and generate scores for the WMLS-R English Form A, WMLS-R English Form B, and WMLS-R Spanish Form. A variety of reports are available including:

      • Score Report
      • Roster Report
      • Age / Grade Profiles Report
      • Standard Score / Percentile Rank Report

      Interpretation

      The WMLS-R NU generates considerable amounts of useful information. Different derived test and clusters scores offer data on growth, language proficiency, relative status among peers, and more. Cognitive-academic language proficiency (CALP), for example, determines oral language dominance of the bilingual subject. Student progress is reflected by the CALP score and can be tracked through repeated administration from a beginning level to an advanced level of proficiency.

      Qualitative information, such as native language, language exposure outside of school, and test session behavior, can also be recorded for use in the overall interpretation of test results.

      The seven tests available on WMLS-R NU yield eleven different interpretive clusters.

      Cluster Tests Description
      Oral Expression Test 1: Picture Vocabulary
      Test 6: Story Recall
      Measure of expressive vocabulary, language comprehension and development, and memory
      Listening Test 2: Verbal Analogies
      Test 5: Understanding Directions
      Measure of listening ability,comprehension, and linguistic competency
      Oral Language Test 1: Picture Vocabulary
      Test 2: Verbal Analogies
      Brief measure of listening and speaking skills, including language development and verbal reasoning
      Reading-Writing Test 3: Letter-Word Identification
      Test 4: Dictation
      Measure of letter and word identification skills and spelling, punctuation, capitalization, and word usage skills
      Reading Test 3: Letter-Word Identification
      Test 7: Passage Comprehension
      Measure of reading achievement, including letter and word identification skills and the ability to comprehend written passages
      Writing Test 4: Dictation Measure of spelling, capitalization, punctuation, and word usage
      Language Comprehension Test 6: Story Recall
      Test 7: Passage Comprehension
      Measure of listening and reading comprehension abilities
      Applied Language Proficiency Test 4: Dictation
      Test 5: Understanding Directions
      Test 6: Story Recall
      Test 7: Passage Comprehension
      Measure of the proficiency with which an individual can effectively apply listening, speaking, reading, writing, and comprehension abilities
      Broad English Ability Test 1: Picture Vocabulary
      Test 2: Verbal Analogies
      Test 3: Letter-Word Identification
      Test 4: Dictation
      Measure of a broad sampling of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills
      Broad English Ability Total Test 1: Picture Vocabulary
      Test 2: Verbal Analogies
      Test 3: Letter-Word Identification
      Test 4: Dictation
      Test 5: Understanding Directions
      Test 6: Story Recall
      Test 7: Passage Comprehension
      Broadest measure of language ability, including listening, speaking, reading, writing, and language comprehension
      Oral Language Total Test 1: Picture Vocabulary
      Test 2: Verbal Analogies
      Test 5: Understanding Directions
      Test 6: Story Recall
      Broad measure of language competency, including listening and speaking skills, language development, verbal reasoning, and language comprehension

      Six Levels of Cognitive-Academic Language Proficiency (CALP)

      • Level 6:
        Very Advanced. When compared with others of the same age or grade, an individual at level 6 demonstrates very advanced cognitive-academic language proficiency. If provided with monolingual instruction at the subject's chronological age or corresponding grade level, it is expected that a student at level 6 will find the language demands of the learning task extremely easy.

      • Level 5:
        Advanced. When compared with others of the same age or grade, an individual at level 5 demonstrates advanced cognitive-academic language proficiency. If provided with monolingual instruction at the subject's chronological age or corresponding grade level, it is expected that a student at level 5 will find the language demands of the learning task very easy.

      • Level 4:
        Fluent. When compared with others of the same age or grade, an individual at level 4 demonstrates fluent cognitive-academic language proficiency. If provided with monolingual instruction at the subject's chronological age or corresponding grade level, it is expected that a student at level 4 will find the language demands of the learning task manageable.

      • Level 3:
        Limited. When compared with others of the same age or grade, an individual at level 3 demonstrates limited cognitive-academic language proficiency. If provided with monolingual instruction at the subject's chronological age or corresponding grade level, it is expected that a student at level 3 will find the language demands of the learning task difficult.

      • Level 2:
        Very Limited. When compared with others of the same age or grade, an individual at level 2 demonstrates very limited cognitive-academic language proficiency. If provided with monolingual instruction at the subject's chronological age or corresponding grade level, it is expected that a student at level 2 will find the language demands of the learning task extremely difficult.

      • Level 1:
        Negligible. When compared with others of the same age or grade, an individual at level 1 demonstrates negligible cognitive-academic language proficiency. If provided with monolingual instruction at the subject's chronological age or corresponding grade level, it is expected that a student at level 1 will find the language demands of the learning task impossible to manage.

      Technical Information

      The WMLS-R NU includes normative data from more than 8,800 individuals in more than 100 geographically diverse communities that are representative of the U.S. population from ages 2 to 90+, including college and university undergraduate and graduate students' the same norming sample from the WJ III® NU.

    • From the Author

      Assessing English-Spanish Bilingual Students with the Woodcock-Muñoz Language Survey® Revised (WMLS™-R)

      by Fredrick A. Schrank



      Assessment of an English-Spanish bilingual individual poses many unique measurement and interpretive challenges to even the most competent and well-trained bilingual examiner. Because most examiners are not Spanish speakers, they often lack the language abilities, knowledge base, tools, and resources to conduct adequate psychoeducational assessments of individuals who use Spanish in whole or in part. As English-Spanish bilingual students are a rapidly growing segment of the population in most school districts in the United States, referrals for assessment are increasing in frequency and creating a dilemma for examiners who do not speak Spanish.

      Because bilingual individuals use language that differs from the majority of Americans and from each other, measurement of language differences must necessarily become both a conceptual and methodological part of bilingual assessment. Professionals who conduct bilingual assessments have long been concerned with the concept of language dominance, primarily as a practical question that influences decisions about conducting intellectual ability testing in English verses Spanish. Professionals are well aware of the limitations of traditional language-dominance assessments that merely indicate which language is stronger. That information is not helpful in understanding the subject’s language or measured cognitive abilities, especially when the subject is weak in both languages. Until recently, there was no available methodology to accurately describe the subject’s relative proficiency in each language.

      The WMLS-R English form and the WMLS-R Spanish form are sets of individually administered tests that provide a broad sampling of proficiency in oral language, reading, and writing. The seven tests included in the WMLS-R can be administered to obtain information about the subject’s language proficiency levels. When both the English and Spanish forms are administered to the same subject, an examiner not only obtains quantitative information on which of the two languages is stronger (or dominant) but also information on the subject’s relative proficiency in each language.

      One important benefit to examiners who do not speak Spanish is that the Spanish form can be administered by another individual (such as a bilingual teacher or paraprofessional service extender) who can read and speak Spanish and who can learn the relatively simple procedures for administering the survey. (This process is made easier because the procedures are the same in English and Spanish.) After administering the selected subtests, the service extender can provide the primary examiner with the information required by the Scoring and Reporting Program (provided with each test) to produce a narrative report of the subject’s comparative language proficiency.

      Examiners will find the WMLS-R a valuable resource for assessment of English-Spanish bilingual students. Examiners who are not Spanish speakers can obtain important information on a subject’s level of Spanish language proficiency by having a Spanish-speaking service extender administer the Spanish survey tests. In addition to its immediate practical application in determining language dominance, use of the surveys can provide additional information to professionals who need to determine a subject’s levels of English or Spanish language proficiency, who want to help teachers understand a subject’s cognitive-academic language abilities, or who need to assess student progress or readiness for English-only instruction.

      Fredrick A. Schrank is a member of the Woodcock Johnson author team. He is the director of the Woodcock Muñoz Foundation and worked closely with Drs. Woodcock and Muñoz in the development of the WMLS-R.

    • Additional Resources

      The following bulletins are intended to provide education professionals and clinicians with supportive technical data, feature comparisons, and practical applications of the Woodcock-Muñoz Language Survey®-Revised Normative Update (WMLS-R NU). Riverside Publishing invites you to print and read these complimentary bulletins as needed, and to share them with colleagues who use the WJ III NU® family of products to diagnose learning disabilities, plan educational programs, provide psychometric training, conduct research, and more.

      • Support Bulletin for the Woodcock-Muñoz Language Survey-Revised Normative Update Scoring and Reporting Program (WMLS-R NU)
        Download WMLS-R NU Support Bulletin (0.58 MB)

      • Support Bulletin for the Instructional Interventions Program for the Woodcock-Muñoz Language Survey-Revised Normative Update (IIP/WMLS-R NU)
        Download IIP Support Bulletin (0.58 MB)

      Training materials are available to help you administer and score the Woodcock-Muñoz Language Survey-Revised (WMLS-R). Click Shop Now to learn more.

  • IIP WMLS-R NU

    Take the guesswork out of instruction with the Instructional Interventions Program for the WMLS-R Normative Update (IIP/WMLS-R NU). This system prescribes specific interventions for reading, writing, and language acquisition while customizing them to levels of difficulty and intensity based on students' WMLS-R NU scores.

    Now, with one instrument, you will be able to test English language development and recommend data-driven, research-based instructional interventions tied directly to student scores.

    For supporting English Language Learners, the IIP/WMLS-R NU will include cluster-level language interventions derived from research-based practices, including findings of the Carnegie Foundation Report, The National Literacy Panel Report on Language Minority Children and Youth, the Center for Applied Linguistics, and the U.S. Department of Education's Institute of Education Sciences.

    • Direct Vocabulary Instruction provides approaches for teaching the vocabulary that support reading comprehension and building knowledge in the content areas.

    • Focus on Academic Language encourages the active learning and practice of academic language that are central to success in school.

    • Build Background Knowledge inspires student confidence by building on existing student knowledge that impacts comprehension.

    Note: The WMLS-R NU and IIP/WMLS-R NU Kits include the WMLS-R NU Scoring and Reporting Program, the Technical Manual, and the newest norms on a CD-ROM. The WMLS-R NU Test Books, Subject Response Books, and Examiner's Manuals remain unchanged from the original WMLS-R version.

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