The Divine Invasion

by Philip Dick
$13.95
1

In The Divine Invasion, the second book in Philip K. Dick's VALIS trilogy, the author continues his search for meaning, and for God. And, once again, his search takes him off of planet Earth. Indeed, Dick shows the Nietzche was wrong: God is not dead, he has merely been exiled to an extraterrestrial planet. It is on this planet that Yah--as this possible God is known--meets Herb Asher and convinces him to help Yah return to Earth, which is itself under the control of the demonic Belial.

To do this, Asher must shepherd a woman pregnant with Yah past the tight security of Earth, avoiding missiles, capture, and forced abortion along the way. Featuring virtual reality, parallel worlds, and interstellar travel, The Divine Invasion blends philosophy and adventure in a way few authors can pull off.

As with VALIS and The Transmigration of Timothy Archer, The Divine Invasion questions just how much anyone really knows--or really can know--about the nature of reality and God. Part science fiction adventure, part religious inquiry, The Divine Invasion stands strong as the most accessible of Dick's famous trilogy.


  • Format: Paperback
  • ISBN-13/EAN: 9780547572420
  • ISBN-10: 0547572425
  • Pages: 272
  • Publication Date: 10/18/2011
  • Carton Quantity: 24

About the book

God is not dead, he has merely been exiled to an extraterrestrial planet. And it is on this planet that God meets Herb Asher and convinces him to help retake Earth from the demonic Belial. Featuring virtual reality, parallel worlds, and interstellar travel, The Divine Invasion blends philosophy and adventure in a way few authors can achieve. 

 

As the middle novel of Dick’s VALIS trilogy, The Divine Invasion plays a pivotal role in answering the questions raised by the first novel, expanding that world while exploring just how much anyone can really know—even God himself. 

 

About the author
Philip Dick

Over a writing career that spanned three decades, PHILIP K. DICK (1928–1982) published 36 science fiction novels and 121 short stories in which he explored the essence of what makes man human and the dangers of centralized power. Toward the end of his life, his work turned toward deeply personal, metaphysical questions concerning the nature of God. Eleven novels and short stories have been adapted to film, notably Blade Runner (based on Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?), Total Recall,Minority Report, and A Scanner Darkly. The recipient of critical acclaim and numerous awards throughout his career, Dick was inducted into the Science Fiction Hall of Fame in 2005, and in 2007 the Library of America published a selection of his novels in three volumes. His work has been translated into more than twenty-five languages.