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READ 180 for Students in Special Education

Every student learns differently. No one knows this better than a parent of a child with special needs. READ 180 assesses and teaches to the specific needs and strengths of each child, providing customized instructions to help him or her succeed in the classroom.

Special Features

  • Age-appropriate, adaptive software lets students move at their own pace.
  • Small-group learning allows teachers to tailor instruction to students’ needs.
  • Interactive lessons and information delivered in many modes—such as...

Special Features

  • Age-appropriate, adaptive software lets students move at their own pace.
  • Small-group learning allows teachers to tailor instruction to students’ needs.
  • Interactive lessons and information delivered in many modes—such as video, pictures, and paper and electronic texts—make sure all students see it, say it, hear it, read it, and write it.
  • High-interest topics keep students motivated and engaged.
  • Universal Design features and 508 compliance allow struggling readers with certain physical disabilities to use the READ 180 Software.
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"After READ 180, I became more adept to reading out loud.... I wasn’t afraid."

What is an IEP?

Every student who receives special education services must have an education plan designed to meet the student’s specific needs. This plan is called an Individualized Education Program (IEP)...

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What is an IEP?

Every student who receives special education services must have an education plan designed to meet the student’s specific needs. This plan is called an Individualized Education Program (IEP). The IEP is created by a team that includes educators, specialists, the student’s parents, and often, the student.


An IEP has two main purposes: It sets appropriate learning goals for the student. It also outlines services that the school district will provide to help the student reach those goals. These services often include daily classroom modifications or accommodations that support the student’s needs and help level the playing field.


READ 180 includes embedded instructional practices that support students with a variety of learning styles. READ 180 also offers the flexibility for teachers to tailor instruction to meet individual student needs and provide the daily accommodations and modifications necessary for Special Education students to succeed.

ELL, PDD, IEP—OMG: Decoding the Special Education Acronyms

When our son was a toddler, he began speech therapy through Early Intervention. Suddenly, my husband and I found ourselves in the uncharted waters of special education...
Decoding the Special Education Acronyms (PDF)

ELL, PDD, IEP—OMG: Decoding the Special Education Acronyms

When our son was a toddler, he began speech therapy through Early Intervention. Suddenly, my husband and I found ourselves in the uncharted waters of special education and related services. We now faced a seemingly endless list of acronyms used by those who work in the field.

At first, we got by knowing one acronym: Speech and Language Pathology was known as SLP. But as Julian got older, he qualified for additional services. Then more unfamiliar acronyms began showing up. Many appeared on our correspondence from the school district. Soon, we made a decision. In order to best support our son (and communicate with his therapists), it was time to get with the program. We needed to learn how to translate these terms into a language we understood.

Some acronyms are regional: In New York, for example, services for school-aged students are under the auspices of the Committee on Special Education (CSE). Meanwhile, Texas has the Admission, Review, and Dismissal (ARD) Committee. Most acronyms, however, are derived from regulations and definitions established by the U.S. Department of Education (shortened to DE). The list below includes Special Education acronyms that are recognized nationwide. You’re most likely to come across them as a parent.

  • ABA – Applied Behavioral Analysis
  • ADD/ADHD – Attention Deficit Disorder/Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
  • APE – Adaptive Physical Education
  • AS – Asperger Syndrome
  • ASD – Autism Spectrum Disorder
  • AT – Assistive Technology
  • BIP – Behavior Intervention Plan
  • CD – Cognitive Disability
  • CP – Cerebral Palsy
  • CREATE – Culturally Responsive Education for All: Training and Enhancement
  • ICT/CTT – Integrated Co-Teaching/Collaborative Team Teaching (also called “inclusion” classrooms)
  • DD – Developmental Delay
  • DS – Down Syndrome
  • EBD - Emotional Behavioral Disability – (formerly ED)
  • EI – Early Intervention
  • ELL – English Language Learner (formerly ESL – English as a Second Language)
  • FBA – Functional Behavioral Assessment
  • GID – Gender Identity Disorder
  • HI – Hearing Impaired
  • IDEA – Individuals with Disabilities Education Act
  • IEP – Individualized Education Program
  • LD – Learning Disability/Disabled
  • LRE – Least Restrictive Environment
  • NCLB – No Child Left Behind
  • NVLD/NVD – Non-Verbal Learning Disability
  • OCD – Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
  • ODD – Oppositional Defiant Disorder
  • OHI – Other Health Impairment
  • OT – Occupational Therapy/Therapist
  • PDD-NOS – Pervasive Developmental Disorder, Not Otherwise Specified
  • PT – Physical Therapy/Therapist
  • RTI – Response to Intervention
  • SID – Sensory Integration Dysfunction
  • SLD – Specific Learning Disability
  • SLI – Speech/Language Impairment
  • SLP – Speech/Language Pathology/Pathologist
  • SPD – Sensory Processing Disorder
  • TBI – Traumatic Brain Injury
  • VI – Visual Impairment

60 Seconds to School Success

Talking to Teachers About Your
Child’s Special Needs

Get tips for talking to teachers about special challenges your child is facing.

Research Snapshot

READ 180 Students in Special Education Closed the Gap in Reading Performance

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The Center for Applied Special Technology (CAST)

READ 180 was developed in association with the Center for Applied Special Technology (CAST). Led by Dr. David Rose of Harvard University, the team at CAST helped design READ 180 with various features and functions that make learning more accessible to all students in the program, including Special Education students. To learn more about CAST, visit their website: www.cast.org