Listen to the Desert/Oye al Desierto

by Francisco Mora, Pat Mora


“A bilingual account of some of the animals and sounds commonly found in the Southwestern desert. Each double-page spread depicts a vast expanse of light blue sky with four lines of text—two in English and two in Spanish—on the verso, and a different creature or scene on the recto. . . . The translations are appropriate and provide an excellent opportunity to compare the sounds in the two languages. . . . The illustrations evoke Native American art in shapes and colors, and the bottoms of the pages are adorned with geometric designs. This book is a good choice for reading aloud; young audiences will enjoy the predictable, repetitive text, and its bilingual format enhances its appeal in a variety of multicultural settings.”—School Library Journal

“A very simple text, with each line repeated twice in English plus twice in Spanish, becomes a rhythmic, lyrical bilingual chant suggesting the onomatopoeic powers of both tongues. . . . A brightly decorative geometric motif runs

  • ISBN-13/ EAN: 9780618111442
  • ISBN-10: 0618111441
  • Pages: 32
  • Publication Date: 03/19/2001
  • Carton Quantity: 50
About the Book
About the Authors
  • “A bilingual account of some of the animals and sounds commonly found in the Southwestern desert. Each double-page spread depicts a vast expanse of light blue sky with four lines of text—two in English and two in Spanish—on the verso, and a different creature or scene on the recto. . . . The translations are appropriate and provide an excellent opportunity to compare the sounds in the two languages. . . . The illustrations evoke Native American art in shapes and colors, and the bottoms of the pages are adorned with geometric designs. This book is a good choice for reading aloud; young audiences will enjoy the predictable, repetitive text, and its bilingual format enhances its appeal in a variety of multicultural settings.”—School Library Journal

    “A very simple text, with each line repeated twice in English plus twice in Spanish, becomes a rhythmic, lyrical bilingual chant suggesting the onomatopoeic powers of both tongues. . . . A brightly decorative geometric motif runs